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“Visibilium et invisibilium”

About the artist

Alekos Kyrarinis was born in 1976 in Athens and raised on the island of Tinos, the place of his origin. He worked with his father, Yiannis Kyrarinis, a sculptor in marble, from the age of eleven until 1997, when he was admitted to the Athens School of Fine Arts. At the School he studied at the studio of Jannis Psychopedis and graduated in 2003. He has illustrated the following books: Calendar of Group ALPHA 2003, Verifying the Night (Dimitris Angelis, Neos Astrolavos / Efthyni, Athens 2011), Encima del subsuelo /Above the subsoil (Kostas Vrachnos, limited edition, Athens 2012), issues 1,2,3 of the magazine “Nea Efthyne”, Drippings from the tiles (Monk Antonios Romaios, En Plo editions, Athens 2015), issue 1 of the magazine “Anthivola”. He collaborates with the magazine “Frear” and with the cultural space “Baumstrasse”. He has published an essay book about painting entitled “Nefeli’s questions”, Mikros Astrolavos /Efthyni, Athens 2011.His work has been shown in 16 solo exhibitions in Greece, Spain and Belgium. He has participated in several group exhibitions in Italy, Belgium, Luxembourg, Austria, Poland, Romania, France and Spain.

About the exhibition

Citronne Gallery is hosting Alekos Kyrarinis’ seventeenth solo exhibition. His latest works mark the end of a two-year period of prolific artistic production. 28 large and small-scale works of egg tempera on wood, 10 mixed technique drawings on paper, 5 sculptures in the round or overpainted Tinian marble reliefs (the island of Tinos is the artist’s birthplace) and 1 video clip for an excerpt of the composition by Giorgos Koumendakis, The Pedal Tone of a Child, which is the outcome of the cooperation and mutual respect between the composer and the painter. Through the works of this exhibition, works that encapsulate all the characteristics of his artistry, Kyrarinis complements, extends and further refines a career in painting of almost twenty years.

Since 2004, Kyrarinis has been consistent with his career and artistic vision, painting by painting and exhibition by exhibition, in his own unique personal style and —paraphrasing Plato—works “are turned by him into something nobler”. Kyrarinis’ painting is a fascinating amalgam of influences that have been so utterly assimilated that they have become difficult to distinguish: Islamic calligraphy, Miró’s biomorphism, Picasso’s cubism, Jean Dubuffet’s Art Brut, Matisse’s elaborate use of colour, Paul Klee’s thin lines and playful style. Almost always, his subjects include portraits of Angels or Angels defeating evil or Saints-knights spearing dragons, in other words, his subject is essentially one: the conflict between Good and Evil, the former’s domination over the latter. In essence, it is an allegory of human passions. In his works, space is shallow, anti-physiocratic and defies western art’s third dimension, yet with full respect to the achievements of the early 20th-century modernists. Kyrarinis’ draws from the archetypes of the art of the Near East, albeit not exclusively. Those Spotless Archetypes in the words of Fotis Kontoglou, and that is why space in his works is overwhelmed by varied decorative motifs which stem from a very large time frame ranging from the distant past to the present: from the late antiquity to the byzantine and post-byzantine era moving on to popular marble sculpture and woodcarving to Nikos Gabriel Pentzikis. All motifs play an instrumental part in the composition because their use is the result of Kyrarinis’ profound awareness of their symbolism and visual importance.

With Alekos Kyrarinis’ exhibition, entitled, "Visibilium et invisibilium", Citronne Gallery continues with its exhibition programme which aspires to host carefully selected exhibitions of contemporary Greek art and thus, to enrich and provide more insight on contemporary Greek art. The debate between the past and the present is both visible and invisible in Alekos Kyrarinis’ works; it is an active debate on behalf of the artist that is open to multiple interpretations from the viewer.

The exhibition comes with a bilingual catalogue which features comments on all works by Nikolaos Paisios, who is the curator of the exhibition and also an introductory note by Tatiana Spinari, Art Historian and director of Citronne Gallery.

Curator: Nikolaos Paissios
Lighting: Maria Maneta

Ars Longa

Adamakos, C. Gianakos, G. Lappas, Th/poulos, Kyrarinis, Markou
Ars Longa
October 2 - October 17, 2020
Athens

19 Patriarchou Ioakim
4th floor
10675 Athens
Greece

(+30) 210 7235 226

Opening Hours
Tue, Thu, Fr: 11.00-20.00
Wed, Sat: 11.00-16.00

About the exhibition

Citronne gallery Athens presents a selection of artworks by six artists as a preview of its participation in the forthcoming online "Art Athina, 2020".
"Ars Longa", Citronne gallery’s starting point in terms of subject, exhibits and brings together contemporary artworks - painting, sculpture, construction, photography.

The art media used are diverse, the artists come from different eras and backgrounds; however, they form a palimpsest of ideas and creativity which hovers above time and space. What we are trying to demonstrate, to prove, is that Art transcends human limits, and the finite human life.

In our days, humanity is undergoing a great, unforeseen ordeal which is dominated by the fear of the unknown. In parallel or even against this distress, Art raises protective and defensive walls, breaks free from the neurotic rationalism of our days and guarantees the value of continuity, the immortality of Creation.
Yiannis Adamakos and his abstractions, Cris Gianakos of the Diaspora , the transcendental Makis Theofylaktopoulos, Alekos Kyrarinis and his Byzantine obsessions, the post mortem multifaceted George Lappas and photographer Nikos Markou give life to this creative spirit.

Ars Longa is a wakeup call against the current nightmare. Between bloom and wear, between the brevity of life - vita brevis and the longevity of memory, Art had and still has the power to go beyond sensible limits and to withstand time, surpassing human dimension, human state and human boundaries.

Yiannis Adamakos seeks to exhaust the boundaries between the sensible world and the subjective-subconscious reception of reality. He dredges up and explains the traces of memory. He demonstrates that the limits between present and past are forged in Memory. Similarly, the limits between light and darkness, noise and silence, dream and experience, nature and fantasy fuse into colour.

Cris Gianakos, a well known visual artist of the Greek Diaspora. He is interested in architecture, ancient civilisations and human behaviour. He is fascinated by geometrical forms and classical proportions as well as their cultural and spiritual aspect. With the dynamic composition of clear geometric levels, such as the Cross and the Diagonal, it hints at the supremacy of pure emotions.

Makis Theofylaktopoulos, representing Greek expressionism, has created a soaring universe of painting excellence and existential depth, at the centre of which lies the human or human-like form. Given that he constantly reinvents his technique anew, he goes from representation to an almost autobiographical abstraction as it seeks "artistic emission", that is, the power of painting to pulsate irrationally within its viewer With a constantly reinvented technique, he goes from the representation of the form to an almost autobiographical abstraction, in search of the "artistic emission" - that is, the possibility of the painting pulsating horses inside its viewer. The image of a solitary, urban person in such a difficult world, concerns human existence per se.

Alekos Kyrarinis, with a varied visual signature, with personal meanings and collective memories, he continues with his complex, strictly personal quest. Kyrarinis’ painting is a fascinating amalgam of influences that have been so utterly assimilated that they have become difficult to distinguish - from Byzantine semantics to Islamic calligraphy and contemporary visual artists, from Greece or abroad. Space in his works is overwhelmed by varied decorative motifs which stem from a very large time frame ranging from the late antiquity to the byzantine and post-byzantine era moving on to popular marble sculpture and woodcarving. All motifs play an instrumental part in the composition because their use is the result of Kyrarinis’ profound awareness of their symbolism and visual importance.

George Lappas rejects limitations; he is indifferent to "rationality." He is characterised by and expresses the eternal desire of man to exceed limits. His world is composed of metal, plastic fabric, electric lamps. These unexpected materials create a sense of paradox, of the uncanny, which evokes subconscious oneiric connections, and hard-to-apprehend associations. After all, Lappas defies limitations, he is indifferent to rationality. The physical body is abolished; thought, memory and narration work exclusively in their internal rationale. His works are first and foremost a study of the relationship between body and space and time, a reflection on the relations of the past and the future of sculpture, the structural parameters of plastic arts and architecture in relation to location, but also a dive into aspects of the human soul.

Nikos Markou provides a photographic definition of an inner world, an Inner Space. From selected landscapes he shifts to an inner reality. Moreover, from natural rendering he moves to technical mutative treatment. The end result leads the viewer to a “fabricated” reality. These photographs are no longer photographs of landscapes or people, but interior landscapes- namely a transcendent reconstruction whose starting point is assimilated through the photographer’s decisive and subjective interpretation.

Aegean: Identities + Journeys

About the exhibition

The social and historical reality of today is raising questions and creating acute concerns which we do not fully comprehend or do not comprehend at all. The times we are living through as individuals and as citizens force us to examine issues beyond our experience, and frequently our awareness. In this country, the need for answers, for an analysis, is palpable and increasingly urgent. The transcendent intervention of Art is of the greatest importance.

As an agent in cultural management, Citronne Gallery aims to function as a forum for the exchange of artistic ideas and views. With this in mind, this year we chose a theme, always current, recently enlarged and magnified. The Aegean, our sea, has a long history of life and movement, peace and wars, survival and voyage, work and experience. The exhibition “Aegean: Identities + Journeys” brings together artistic viewpoints on this subject, expressed by nine contemporary artists called upon to provide commentary: Yiannis Adamakos, Michalis Katzourakis, Demosthenis Kokkinidis, Alekos Kyrarinis, Tasos Mantzavinos, Emmanouil Bitsakis, Constantin Xenakis, Sotiris Sorogas, and Jannis Psychopedis.

The artistic works exhibited are accompanied by poems, or extracts of texts, chosen by the artists as an additional representation of reality. At the same time, the poems are independent of the artistic work: that is, they are not the inspiration for the art, but the artists’ stream of conscious commentary on their varied memories and responses to the Aegean. The artistic and the poetic function as a diptych which highlights the crucial significance of the Aegean to the history and the definition of the Greek identity.

Vigilant Heart

Alekos Kyrarinis
Vigilant Heart
July 27, 2013 - September 9, 2013
Poros

Virvili Square
18020 Poros Island
Greece

(+30) 697 9989 684

Opening Hours
Mon-Sun:
11.00-13.00 &19.00-23.00

About the artist

Αlekos Kyrarinis was born in 1976 in Athens and raised on the island of Tinos, the place of his origin. He worked with his father, Yiannis Kyrarins, a sculptor in marble, from the age of eleven until 1997, when he was admitted to the Athens School of Fine Arts. At the School, he studied in the studios of Dimitris Mytaras and Jannis Psychopedis and graduated in 2003.

About the exhibition

With a palimpsestic artistic style, with personal meanings and collective memories, Alekos Kyrarinis deals with a complex, strictly personal quest. The “dragon”, symbol of evil, dominates in his artistic language. From classical Greek mythology, dragons have frightened, threatened, and destroyed until they meet up with the redeemer, the liberator in the form of a hero, a bold man, a saint. The dragon is an allusion to ancient mythical beasts, the Medusa and the Lernaean Hydra; but also to the serpent of the original sin, the dragon-slaying Byzantine saints, the winged reptile-temptation of the hermit holy men and monks, the “accursed serpent” of Karaghiozis, the dragon of folk songs and tales.

“Vigilant Heart”, a wish, a prayer and an objective, is the achievement of the struggle against evil, cunning and wickedness. Faith, Orthodoxy, as a living experience, appears through recognisable symbols, all of them the product of experience, both spiritual and fleshly. The senses come alive with the iconography, the chants, the candles and frankincense, Holy Communion and the antidoron. The dragon is exiled through faith, virtue prevails, the soul becomes calm, the heart “becomes vigilant”.